Public Art  >  Iconostasis in Orthodox Church

Iconostasis with four tiers of icons in Orthodox Church. (General view)

Iconostasis with four tiers of icons in Orthodox Church. (General view)

Royal Doors in Orthodox Church

Royal Doors in Orthodox Church

General view of the church interior from the North.

General view of the church interior from the North.

An important requirement for the iconostasis is that it looks good in any consecration, regardless of the location of the light source: in front of the iconostasis or behind it.

ICONOSTASIS IN SAINT NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH

The word comes from the Greek εἰκονοστάσι(-ον) (eikonostási(-on), still in common use in Greece and Cyprus), which means "icon stand".

In Eastern Christianity, an iconostasis (Greek: εἰκονοστάσιον) is a wall of icons and religious paintings, separating the nave from the sanctuary in a church. The iconostasis evolved from the Byzantine temple, a process completed by the 15th century.


 

​Particularly interesting was the work on the sketch of the iconostasis, which required me to study in detail the history of the Orthodox church and its decoration. I looked through more than a hundred different iconostasis, and I visited old churches in Pskov district where old objects of worship were preserved. The challenge was that the customer wanted to see the large type of iconostasis, including four tiers of icons. 
Using for the iconostasis a thin steel sheet covered with different textures made by electric arc welding, I referred to Russian icon cases made of thin silver or copper, thus linking modern techniques with traditions.
Altar, menorah,  seven-candlestick, lampadas, chandeliers,  throne, and credence table were ordered and executed later.

Saint Nicholas Orthodox Church in the village Mezhniki, Leningrad Oblast, Russia. 

2008-2010